Publications

Green Plants For Green Buildings to Sponsor Panel of Scientific Researchers

global research leaders

By Joe Zazzera, LEED AP, GRP | August, 2011 | topics: Press Release, Research

A panel of global research leaders in the field of indoor plants will convene on Thursday December 1, 2011, to discuss research to date on the effect of plants on indoor environmental quality.

At the 9th Annual Cities Alive Green Roofs For Healthy Cities conference in Philadelphia, these thoughtful, dedicated scientists will discuss research completed to date and make recommendations for future research.

Never before have such important researchers gathered to discuss their work and findings. Not for profit organization, Green Plants For Green Buildings will sponsor the panel discussion. www.GPGB.org

Confirmed panelists are:

Professor Margaret Burchett (BSc, PhD, Dip. Educ.) A plant environmental biologist/toxicologist. Over the last 15 years she has led research at the University of Technology, Sydney in the Plants and Indoor Environmental Quality Group, focusing on the uses of potted-plants to reduce urban indoor air pollution, and to promote health and well-being for building occupants.

Dr. Alan Darlington-Adjunct biology professor and research scientist from The University of Guelph-Developer of NedLaw living wall biological filtration system.

Dr. Bodie Pennisi-Research Scientist and Associate Professor at The University of Georgia. Lead researcher of “project carbon”.

Dr. Bill Wolverton, Former NASA Research Scientist- conducted the first known research studies on indoor plants and VOC removal for the space program. Dr. Wolverton is best known for the earliest studies on the benefits of living plants indoors.

The discussion will be moderated by Green Plants for Green Buildings Board members Joe Zazzera and Amanda Culiver.

Registration information can be found at the Green Roofs For Healthy Cities website. www.greenroofs.org

Green Earth-Green Plants Publication

green earth – green plants names advisory council

By www.greenearthgreenplants.com | July 6th, 2010 | topics: green business, certified business, green earth green plants certified

Green Earth—Green Plants® announced today the formation of its Advisory Council.  The group’s membersare green certified interior plantscape businesses and other interested businesses, organizations and individuals.  “We are happy to announce the formation of this Advisory Council who will represent our Certified Business members and provide important feedback for the Certification Program” says Kathy Fediw, LEED AP, CLP, CLT, president of Johnson Fediw Associates and founder of the certification program.

The Advisory Council members are:

Joe Zazzera, LEED AP, GRP:  president and CEO of Plant Solutions, Inc.

Jennifer Bermudez-Perez: president, Growing Roots LLC franchise

Mike Langwiser:  operations manager of Atria, Inc.

Jim Mumford, GRP, CLP:  president of Good Earth Plant Company, Inc.

Joey Steinbeck, CLT:  general manager of Foliage Concepts, Inc.

Those on the Advisory Council must be an owner or employee of a Green Earth—Green Plants® Certified Business or the manufacturer of an Approved Product and prove their dedication to promoting eco-friendly business practices.  They are all serving as volunteers to this program.  They will be advising on the revisions and updates to the certification assessment; the valuation of the assessment’s point system; and future direction of the program.

“We at Johnson Fediw Associates are very grateful to this group of hard-working individuals and know that their feedback is crucial to the continuing success of this program” says Fediw.   The Green Earth—Green Plants® program certifies eco-friendly interior plantscape businesses and projects and includes recommendations for Approved Products.

Johnson Fediw Associates is a third-party consulting firm providing green certification programs to horticulture businesses.  For more information on the Green Earth—Green Plants® program, go to www.greenearthgreenplants.com or call 281-687-6966.

Concerns About Mold and Indoor Plants

news you can use – a response to concerns about mold and indoor plants

By Plant Solutions | July 2010 | Topics: Benefits of Plants

Not only do indoor plants aid in suppressing airborne microbes, but when they are properly maintained by a professional Interior Plantscape Contractor, there is less opportunity to produce mold, harmful or not. Proper care, lighting and watering will help avoid such problems”. Joe Zazzera, LEED AP, GRP

More useful information from GPGB LEED Advocate Chair, Joe Zazzera:

According to the State of Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services Indoor Fungal Infestations and Mycotoxicity: “There are no confirmed cases of mycotoxicity, via inhalation exposure, in residential or office settings”. Additionally, “The presence of mold in a building does not in itself constitute a health threat”.

To view the entire article, go to:

In an additional study conducted by Dr. B.C. Wolverton, Interior Plants Influence On Airborne Microbes Inside Energy–efficient Buildings: “significant findings indicate that large quantities of indoor plants may be used to increase humidity levels and suppress levels of mold spores and other airborne microbes inside energy-efficient buildings, while reducing air polluting substances”.

To view the entire article, go to: http://www.wolvertonenvironmental.com/MsAcad-96.pdf

For more information on the many health and environmental benefits of using living plants indoors visit http://www.greenplantsforgreenbuildings.org/

Barrel Cactus Living Wall

By LivingWallArt.com | May 2010 | Topics: Living Vertical Greenwalls

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The Barrel Cactus Vertical Living Wall was built-in Scottsdale, Arizona. Designed by Joe Zazzera, GRP, LEED and installed by the Plant Solutions Team in May this year, this project is a vertical living wall using golden barrel cacti and a custom-built frame. A. Dunham Workshop built the vertical frame out of steel. The intent was to create a piece of “living art” to draw attention to the entry of the Plant Solutions design showroom.
Extra Media Published By: LivingWallArt.com

There’s Opportunity in ‘Them There Walls’

favorite methods takes advantage of biofiltration

By Plant Solutions | July 2010 | Topics: Living Vertical Greenwalls

Joe Zazzera, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP), is probably way too young to remember the cartoon character Yosemite Sam. Yet, like this Warner Brothers creation, he, too, sees golden opportunities. His, though, don’t reside in the western hills; they reside in urban landscapes in virtually every city in the country. Zazzera, president and CEO for Arizona-based Plant Solutions, is excited about transforming interior walls into plantscapes. “At one location, we’ve installed a small green wall to replace our client’s use of cut flowers,” he explains. “Live-plant walls are different, pique interest, and they are a practical use of available space.

“With real estate costs going up, architects are designing away atriums and other garden areas in favor of revenue-producing space. Live-plant walls don’t take up valuable space. They are also very attractive and functional, providing the same air-quality benefits that other indoor gardens provide.”

Zazzera notes that interior plantscapers can employ any of several different methods to install green walls. One of the favorite methods takes advantage of biofiltration. The green wall is constructed of a special, foam-like medium. Water is circulated through the medium via a small water fountain beneath the wall. In this scenario, the customer gets the benefits of two features — a green wall and a water feature.

“Green walls are new and exciting, and they’re not budget breakers for clients,” Zazzera goes on to explain. “In some cases, if you’re replacing cut flowers with a small, live-plant wall, the cost is already in the budget. On average, it will cost your clients around $100 per square foot for installing a green wall, or they can choose to lease one. As always, maintenance is key.”

Riding the Green Wave

Green walls are not the only new opportunities for interior plantscapers, says Zazzera, who is actively involved in trying to get interior plants into the LEED rating system. Installing and maintaining green roofs has potential for industry members, as well. “We already have a working relationship with architects and building owners,” he emphasizes. “The truth is that intensive green roofs, those that are heavy and require additional engineering to install, are less common today than their extensive counterparts.” In other words, you don’t have to be an architect or engineer to install every green roof, says Zazzera.

Green roofs come in all different shapes, sizes, and complexities. They do have their challenges, he emphasizes, not the least of which involve safety concerns working on roofs and maintaining plants in a sometimes hostile environment. A good place for beginners to start is to access the Green Roofs for Healthy Cities Web site, greenroofs.org. The group is a valuable resource for learning about installing green roofs, and obtaining its Green Roof Professional designation will help interior plantscapers get their “foot in the door” of prospective clients.

The fresh opportunities presented by green roofs and green walls align with growing interest in sustainable landscapes and environments. As Zazzera relates, buildings already receive LEED credit points for having green roofs that reduce water runoff, provide additional insulation, and reduce the heat island effect. He chairs an advocacy group that’s lobbying the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to award LEED credit points for interior plants, also. When that day arrives, he points out, green walls and green interiors overall will be even more attractive investments for building owners.

Jetson Green Publication

plant walls for vibrant green spaces

By Preston Koerner | May 12, 2010 | topics: IAQ, Landscape, Modern design

The folks at Plant Solutions installed this vibrant living wall in a conference room of their Scottsdale office. The TerraScreen Living Wall is made with two 4’x4′ panels, which are made with a black, powder-coated, galvanized steel wire, and brackets that attach to the wall. The panels protrude a little less than five inches from the wall.

Plants are placed in 6″ no-hole cachepots and an irrigation system keeps them watered. This installation has pothos plants with colorful Neoregelia Medusa variety, according to Living Wall Art.

Green walls, like other interior plants, not only bring a slice of nature to the unnatural, but they also capture airborne pollution through absorption or by sticking to the plants. They can be good for indoor air quality.

Living walls are popular these days, especially with a NY Times article on the topic by Kristina Shevory, “Gardens that Grow on Walls.” It should be clear, though, they require care and a plan with respect to irrigation, lighting, nutrition, and plant choice. Some living walls die, while other green walls thrive.

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